Antelope Hunter
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How to read a point summary report

This example will show you how to read a point summary report.

How to Read Preference Point Summary

EXAMPLE: By looking at the red/bold numbers, you can see that two hunters with 16 points applied and both drew the tag. One was a non-resident. We also see that 258 hunters with 0 points applied for this tag as their 1st choice. None were drawn in the 75% draw (Phase 1 or P1) because only applicants with preference points are drawn in that phase.

Section A: 1st Choice Applicant Draw Stats (75% point draw and 25% equal chance draw).

Section B: Preference Point Draw (75% of tags) Stats by point class

Resident Drawn (A): Total number of resident 1st choice applicants drawn.
Non-Resident Drawn (A): Total number of non-resident 1st choice applicants drawn.
Total Applicants (A): Number of 1st choice applicants
Total Drawn (A):  Total number of 1st choice applicants drawn.
Total Points-Apps (A): Cumulative number of points for all 1st choice applicants for individual hunt.
Total Points Drawn P1 (A): Cumulative number of points for 1st choice applicants drawn in Phase 1 (75% preference point draw).
Total Points Drawn P2 (A): Cumulative number of points for 1st choice applicants drawn in Phase 2 (25% equal chance draw).

Points (B): Preference point class (Only point classes represented by applicants for that hunt; some point classes are not represented).
Applicants (B): Number of 1st choice applicants within that preference point class.
Resident Apps (B): Number of resident 1st choice applicants within that preference point class.
Resident Drawn (B): Number of resident drawn within that preference point class.
Non-Resident Apps (B): Number of non-resident 1st choice applicants within that preference point class.
Non-Resident Drawn (B): Number of non-residents drawn within that preference point class.

There is also a pdf available of the above table.

Header photo by Doug Cassidy 

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