5 Alerts
X

The recreational harvest of razor clams is CLOSED from the south jetty of the Siuslaw River to the California border for elevated domoic acid levels.

The Dam Hole on the Trask River closed to fishing on Sept. 1 and will remain closed until Nov. 30.

Effective October 19, the daily bag limit reduces for adult hatchery Chinook 

Retention of wild adult fall Chinook salmon is prohibited effective October 5, 2019.

Steelhead, fall Chinook and coho bag limits reduced to one per day.

Recreation Report

Southwest Area

HuntingMap_v2
Recreation Report

Hunting and fire danger

Dry conditions and the associated fire danger can have a large impact on your hunting opportunity. It pays to check in advance to see if there are any access restrictions in the unit(s) you plan to hunt.

Wolves and coyotes can look alike

Most wolves in the state today are in northeast Oregon but a few have dispersed further west and south. Wolves are protected by state and/or federal law and it is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall. Please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to ODFW using the online reporting system.

Test your identification skills with ODFW’s new Coyote and Gray Wolf ID Quiz.

Use the Oregon Hunting Map to see where to hunt.

OPEN: COYOTE, COUGAR, BLACK BEAR,

COOS COUNTY (west Tioga, west Powers, north Sixes, southwest Siuslaw)

Closures on Private Forestland

Hunters need to be aware that ownership of several timber land parcels in Coos County has recently changed. In some cases the new owners have different access policies than their predecessors. Make sure you know what the policy is before accessing private land and don’t assume the policy is the same as prior years.

Coos Mountain Access

The Coos Mountain Access Area, which has been in effect since Aug. 25, 2018 will continue to have year-round access for the next three years. This is the newest Access Area in Oregon and encompasses about 63,000 acres in the heart of the Tioga Unit. Within this Access Area most of the arterial roads are open for motor vehicle access and many, but not all, of the secondary roads are open for foot or bike access. This new Access Area was created in response to some private landowners in the area expressing a willingness to allow public access in a way that is compatible with their land management goals.

Lands within Coos Mountain Access Area provide excellent opportunities for big game and upland gamebird hunting and viewing. Roads that are open to foot or bike access also provide great opportunities to hike or use mountain bikes in conjunction with hunting and viewing in an area where those opportunities are not plentiful. Roads open to motor vehicles are marked with green dots. All other roads are open, only to foot or bike access. For information on Coos Mountain Access Area, contact The Charleston Field Office at (541)888-5515. Maps are available.

General Deer:  Deer numbers on the south coast have been increasing in recent years in some locations. Buck ratios are adequate for a good season. Hunters will find deer in clearcuts with vigorously growing brush and grass as these forage types are high in nutrition.

When the weather is clear, hunters will find deer moving early in the mornings and late in the evenings. On cloudy or rainy days, deer may move mid-day too. Recent rain has resulted in green up across the landscape. South slopes could be best for finding deer but they could be anywhere because of the prolific food sources. 

Fall black bear: Bear populations in Coos County are healthy and due to the mild clear weather conditions, bear activity has remained very high. The ODFW office is dealing with many damage complaints involving bears. Apples seem to be a very attractive food resource presently. Locating bear trails to apple orchards and setting up a stand on them would be a very good way to hunt bears in this late part of the season.

Here in southern Oregon you can harvest two fall bears when you purchase a SW Additional Fall Black Bear tag. This tag is good for all of units 20-30.

It is mandatory to check in of your bear skull at an ODFW office or designated collection site within 10 days of harvest, the skull must be unfrozen. In addition if you harvest a female bear, please turn in the entire reproductive tract to ODFW if possible. See page 59 in the big game hunting regulations or MyODFW.com for more information.

Elk: Most of the elk populations in the Coos County area in pretty good shape even though most are a little below management objectives for population size. Bull ratios in the populations are mostly at or above management objectives and reproduction in the herds has been high enough to maintain herd sizes.

Weather has had a big influence on elk distribution this fall. With recent sunny, mild conditions, elk are spending much of their time in heavy timber and are very inactive during day light. However, the weather forecast indicates the dry conditions may end soon. This should have a positive influence on elk activity during the day.

Coyote: Numbers are strong throughout Coos County. Using predator calls to lure them in can be an effective method for harvesting coyotes. Try calling in early morning and late afternoon. Be sure to ask permission before hunting on private land.

Test your identification skills with ODFW’s new Coyote and Gray Wolf ID Quiz.

Cougar: Cougar has reopened with the new year. The most productive way to hunt cougar is to use a predator call. Hunters are reminded if they harvest a cougar, they must have it checked in to an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. See the 2019 Oregon Big Game Regulations for details.

DOUGLAS COUNTY (Dixon, S. Indigo, NW Evans Creek, Melrose, SW Siuslaw, E. Tioga and NE Powers Units)

Cougar: Look in areas adjacent to agriculture and within areas of higher concentrations of deer. When fresh tracks are found, set up and call with either mouth or electronic predator calls.

Cougars are abundant throughout with indicators pointing to stable or increasing numbers. Hunting cougar is a challenge because these animals are very secretive, but harvest success is greatest adjacent to private land with high deer populations using a predator call.

Coyote: Numbers are strong throughout Douglas County. Using predator calls to lure them in can be an effective method for harvesting coyotes. Try calling in early morning and late afternoon. Be sure to ask permission before hunting on private land.

Test your identification skills with ODFW’s new Coyote and Gray Wolf ID Quiz.

Fall black bear: The season opened Aug. 1.

JACKSON, JOSEPHINE, CURRY COUNTIES (Applegate, Chetco, Evans Creek, Rogue, portions of Dixon, and Sixes)

Apply for youth deer hunts on C2 Ranch near Medford

ODFW’s Access and Habitat Program and the C2 Ranch 10 guided youth rifle hunts for black-tailed deer on the ranch’s property near Medford. Youth hunters must apply by Nov. 29 and must possess a 630T Rogue Unit Youth Deer controlled hunt tag or be eligible through the Youth “First Time” program for a 600-series tag. Youth hunts are guided.

Youth application

Denman Wildlife Area

Reminder for all deer and elk hunter, once you find out whether you got a controlled deer and/or elk tag or not, you will still need to pick up your tags. Etag – you still have to go to the online account – purchase from the catalog – and choose your tag. If you have a Sports Pac you will have a “$” symbol next to your tag. It will populate your cart as zero payment. If you don’t have a Sports Pac, you will have to pay for the tag. Paper tag – you can go online or to a license agent and purchase your tag. If you have any problems contact an ODFW office for assistance.

Deer: Archery deer season is now open in the Rogue and Evans Creek units. The late season archery is off to a slow start and will hopefully pick up once we get some precipitation in southwest Oregon.

If you happen to harvest a deer and are in the vicinity of one of ODFW’s field offices we would appreciate you stopping by so we can gather samples from your deer for age analysis and Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing. Although CWD has never been documented in Oregon regular monitoring of our deer and elk populations ensures early detection once it arrives in the state; this will aid in combating its spread once it is detected in Oregon.

Elk: Coast elk 2nd Season begins in the Applegate Unit on Nov. 16 and will continue through Nov 22. Elk densities are low in the Applegate unit which can make for hard hunting. It is recommended that you do not hunt this unit without prior scouting.

Fall black bear: Bear hunting will continue through the end of the year. Hunters can expect another good year. The Applegate unit has historically had some of the highest harvest in the state so focus your efforts there; however, the Rogue and Evans Creek units can also be very productive.

Fawn calls and other animal in distress sounds can be a useful tool when trying to harvest a bear.

Here in southern Oregon you can harvest two fall bears when you purchase a SW Additional Fall Black Bear tag. This tag is good for all of units 20-30.

Remember that there is a mandatory check in of your bear skull at an ODFW office or designated collection site within 10 days of harvest, the skull must be unfrozen.  In addition if you harvest a female bear you must turn in the entire reproductive tract to ODFW. Go to MyODFW.com or page 59 of the 2019 Big Game Regulations for more information.

Cougar season is open statewide year-round or until zone quotas are met (see zone quota page). Please remember it is mandatory to check in any harvested cougar with ODFW, including the unfrozen skull, hide, proof of sex, and reproductive tract if female.  Please call your local office to schedule the check in. For more information refer to page 62 of the 2019 Oregon Big Game Hunting Regulations.

Youth Antlerless Elk seasons began Aug. 1 in many areas across southern Oregon. These are controlled hunts that give youth a long, low-stress hunting season in which they can hopefully harvest an elk.

Elk this time of year are generally up in the national forests foraging in dark timber. As summer ends and weather gets more severe, they generally move down to lower elevations that boarder private land. September can be a very productive time as elk are typically more vocal and even cows can come into an area you’re calling from.

Western gray squirrel: Western gray squirrel hunting remains open with no bag limit in that part of the Rogue unit south of the Rogue River and S Fork Rogue River and north of Hwy 140. See page 63 of the 2019 Oregon Big Game Hunting Regulations for more information.

Coyotes are abundant in our area. Remember to ask for permission to hunt on private lands. Hunters can find coyotes around meadows and brush piles where mice and rabbits are found. Predator calls are very useful when used in conjunction to known prey base.  Remember to identify your target.

Wolves and coyotes can look alike. Wolves are protected by state and/or federal law and it is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall. Please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to ODFW using the online reporting system.