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Effective Feb 1 through June 30, 2020, retention of hatchery Chinook salmon is allowed on the mainstem Umpqua River.  Retention of wild Chinook salmon is prohibited.

Effective through March 31, 2020, all steelhead fishing is closed from McNary Dam to the OR/WA border.

Effective through April 30, 2020, the daily bag limit is one hatchery steelhead.

Steelhead, fall Chinook and coho bag limits reduced to one per day through April 30, 2020.

Recreation Report

Marine Zone

Regulation Updates

Regulation updates as of Jan. 17, 2020

These are in-season regulation changes adopted on a temporary or emergency basis. Please see e-regulations for permanent regulations.

DUNGENESS CRAB

  • Crabbing is closed in the ocean from Oct. 16 – Nov. 30.
  • Recreational crabbing is open in bays and estuaries, and on beaches, docks, piers, and jetties along the entire Oregon coast from the Columbia River to the California border,
  • For recreational crab harvesters, it is recommended that crab always be eviscerated prior to cooking, which includes removal and discard of the viscera, internal organs, and gills.
  • Because of Oregon’s precautionary management of biotoxins, the crab and shellfish products currently being sold in retail markets and restaurants are safe for consumers.
  • Before clamming or crabbing, call ODA’s shellfish safety information hotline at (800) 448-2474 or visit the ODA shellfish closures web page at: http://ODA.direct/ShellfishClosures
  • The consumption of crab viscera is not recommended.

Effective Jan. 1, 2020, recreational crabbers will need to mark all floating surface buoys with the owner’s full name or business name and at least one of the following: phone number, permanent address, ODFW Angler ID number, or vessel identification number. Mark your information in a clear, legible, and permanent manner. While this rule does not apply to gear tied to docks, piers, jetties, or beaches, we recommend marking buoys on any gear that could become derelict or lost. Find more information here.

 RAZOR CLAMS

  • North coast beaches OPEN from the Columbia River to Tillamook Head (south of Seaside)
  • CLOSED from Tillamook Head to the California border.

MUSSELS

  • Mussel harvesting now open along the entire Oregon coast.
Recreation Report

We want your photos

Attention crabbers and clammers – we want your photos!

Whether you’re out digging clams or setting crabpots, we’d love to see photos of your visit to the coast. When you submit your photos to ODFW they could appear on our website or signs, or in social or brochures. What a great way to share your experience with others!

Photo submission form

Always check for closures at the ODA Shellfish Safety page before clamming or crabbing. http://ODA.direct/ShellfishClosures

RAZOR CLAM

All razor clamming is closed on the entire Oregon Coast due to elevated levels of the biotoxin domoic acid. The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will continue to collect razor clam samples along the coast. It takes two consecutive samples below the closure level to open a fishery once closed.

Always call the ODA shellfish safety hotline at 1-800-448-2474 or ODA shellfish closures website before harvesting for the most current information about shellfish safety closures.

BAY CLAMS

Check out the Where to Clam articles for places to find them. You can also get more clamming maps here or at the coastal ODFW offices.

There are negative low tides that are coming up during the holidays. Since negative low tides switch from daytime to night in the winter, clammers should use extra caution when clamming because of poor visibility. Monitor swell and surf advisories before going out to make sure you will have enough time and access to safely clam.

Always call the ODA shellfish safety hotline at 1-800-448-2474 or ODA shellfish closures website before harvesting for the most current information about shellfish safety closures.

CRAB

Effective Jan. 1, 2020, recreational crabbers must mark all floating surface buoys with a name and other identifying information. See more information in the Regulation updates section above. While this rule does not apply to gear tied to docks, piers, jetties or beaches, we recommend marking buoys on any gear that could become derelict or lost. Find more information here.

Crabbing in the Coos Bay estuary is picking up as we head into the winter months. Crabbing by boat and setting pots near the jetties yields the most crab. Dock crabbing in Coos Bay has been slow.

Central coast crabbing in Alsea has been very good with crabbers bringing in large crab by boat and shore. Yaquina Bay has seen fair to poor returns of Dungeness crab. Crabbers are landing fuller crab.

Crabbing in Tillamook Bay has been fair and moderate in Netarts Bay.

In addition to Dungeness crab, another Oregon native present in some of Oregon’s estuaries is the red rock crab. Crabbers can retain 24 red rock crabs of any sex or size. There have also been higher numbers of Pacific rock crab in Yaquina Bay this year. This crab counts as your “Other” shellfish, which has a daily bag limit of 10 in aggregate with other species that fall in this category (see page 82 of the fishing synopsis for more details). While they look very similar to red rock crab, their long antennae and large claws distinguish them; they sometimes have spots on their abdomen.

Some crabbers in estuaries may also encounter non-native European green crab in their catch this year. While they look similar to Oregon’s native shore crabs, they can be identified by the three prominent bumps between the eyes and 5 spines down the side of the carapace. They are not always green and color is not a good identifying feature. The daily catch limit for European green crab also falls in the “Other” shellfish category and is 10 in aggregate with other species that fall in this category (see page 82 of the fishing synopsis for more details). European green crab can be any size or sex.